#Linux Mint #LinuxMint #LMDE #Linux #Debian #Ubuntu #Xfce #MATE desktop #KDE #Cinnamon desktop 

luisetfree:

Linux mint

luisetfree:

Linux mint


16 notes

viquethor:

Deux capture de l’interface cinnamon.

Pour plus d’espace j’ai tout simplement enlevé la liste des application, tout se fait avec l’alt-tab(ou via l’applet scale)


9 notes
juzo-kun:

On the way to switch to full Linux (Mint 17/Cinnamon), still some detail to iron out, tho’. First of all, the Windows 7 installation went AWOL… and even if I’m not really keen in using it I need it for tests.
Everything else went smooth, even if I know the scanner will me give something to sweat over — I have the only one model not automatically recognized by SANE, umphf — hoping the proprietary drivers won’t grieve me too much. I chose Cinnamon because I found the tablet configuration tools are the most straightforward and efficient.
And finally I can use Krita with some proper hardware behind it, heh. The above is a quick ink of a pencil sketch. I really need to get a grip on the various brushes…

juzo-kun:

On the way to switch to full Linux (Mint 17/Cinnamon), still some detail to iron out, tho’. First of all, the Windows 7 installation went AWOL… and even if I’m not really keen in using it I need it for tests.

Everything else went smooth, even if I know the scanner will me give something to sweat over — I have the only one model not automatically recognized by SANE, umphf — hoping the proprietary drivers won’t grieve me too much. I chose Cinnamon because I found the tablet configuration tools are the most straightforward and efficient.

And finally I can use Krita with some proper hardware behind it, heh. The above is a quick ink of a pencil sketch. I really need to get a grip on the various brushes…


8 notes
linux-mint-pony:

A couple of people were asking for the reference I used for Mint and the other distros. Here it is, I’m not sure who made it though…

linux-mint-pony:

A couple of people were asking for the reference I used for Mint and the other distros. Here it is, I’m not sure who made it though…


7 notes

Mint with an i7…

http://38.media.tumblr.com/547b2820eccc398e1b24e74f9ebe9e46/tumblr_n9wjynsvc41qzvnj5o1_1280.png

fameone:

Mint with an i7… Excuse me, I need to go power one LED with sixteen car batteries.

DON’T YOU TELL ME HOW TO PARTY!

I’m still tormented by the Windows Vista days where my soul was sucked from my machine because, at any given time, 60% of my RAM was being used by that horrid OS. I made the switch to Ubuntu, Debian, Mint, Linux Mint Debian, before going the easy route on my daily laptop and stuck with Mint.

I tried Arch, too. But I got over being super l337 real quick and went with something a bit more low-maintenance and simple.

9 notes
fawkeslife:

This weekend I am drinking lots of soda and eating frozen Trader Joe’s food and trying to learn web development stuff.
Look how pretty Linux Mint is though, mmmm yeah dat clean aesthetic

fawkeslife:

This weekend I am drinking lots of soda and eating frozen Trader Joe’s food and trying to learn web development stuff.

Look how pretty Linux Mint is though, mmmm yeah dat clean aesthetic


4 notes

Tonido | Run your own Personal Cloud

» For 32bit (i386/i686) Architecture
To install Tonido in Ubuntu/Linux Mint open Terminal (Press Ctrl+Alt+T) and copy the following commands in the Terminal:







To uninstall from 32bit





» For 64bit (x64/amd64) Architecture
To install Tonido in Ubuntu/Linux Mint open Terminal (Press Ctrl+Alt+T) and copy the following commands in the Terminal:





If you start Tonido and it doesn’t work then run Tonido-Daemon icon (or run in terminal tonido-daemon) and open web-browser -> enter this url http://127.0.0.1:10001
To uninstall from 64bit




http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-IHKADeXs5ag/U9-fHa8VDeI/AAAAAAAAJWM/w3bhUxMS0dU/s1600/ub-lm-cloud.jpg

(Source: noobslab.com)


12 notes

Linux gaming: Quake III Triple monitor setup, Linux Mint, 2x Geforce 8600gts

In this video i show my triple monitor gaming setup running Linux Mint and Quake III. I use some older hardware from 2006!

00:00 Intro
01:29 Hardware
Intel Q6600 cpu @3ghz 8gb ddr2
Asus P5WDG2 ws Professional
Cooler Master ATC201 Corsair HX520
Asus Geforce 8600gts 256mb
Point of View Geforce 8600gts 256mb
OCZ Vertex2 120gb ssd
3x IIyama Prolite E1900S 1280x1024
02:37 Gameplay
Quake III Arena
04:21 Software
A basic guideline what i have done to make this setup work on the software side. If you have mouse problems reconnect your monitors from left to right 05:26
06:29 More Gameplay
Quake III Arena

Music:
Marc Burt - Turbulence Psychadelik Pedestrians (chillout remix)
From the AWESOME Free album!!
http://freemusicarchive.org/music/ToucanMusic/Best_Bytes_Volume_1/


9 notes

4 notes

Why do I use Linux Mint on my primary PC instead of elementary OS or Ubuntu? • /r/linuxmint

Why do you guys use Mint instead of other distros?


12 notes

Material Curricular Libre - www.mclibre.org


1 note

Descargar recopilaciones. cdlibre.org


r—e—a—n—i—m—a—t—i—o—n said:

So I tried the multisystem thing, USB pen drive, using latest 64bit cinnamon *v2.ISO and it seems to work. Selected the recommended Nvidia driver, and a wireless driver (had to use tethering via android to get the internets). So thats new! I don’t know why it works now. Thanks for the advice, in the past attempts I never saw the login screen! Though I can not adjust brightness (nothing happens, always full brightness), I’ll figure that out later. This is great progress :)


Again thanks for the responses!
I think i’ll go with the live USB stuff, done it before, even with other Distros. Then I’ll see what I’ll do from there. Yes i did notice a “*v2.iso” in them, so thats new. I’ll read the release note as well :) In the fast few months I did test latest Fedora (it worked for the most part, but some issues after update), Ubuntu (which i’m using), OpenSUSE (never got it to install), and Mint around the time it came out (No success -I did quite some digging, but I felt that it was way out of my level to find a solution). When I bought this laptop I thought yeah, some good hardware, more RAM, good processor, etc - boy I was wrong…
 will let you know what I do and if it works! thanks a bunch! :)


answering to the linuxmint message:

You are welcome! Please remember to read the release notes of each Linux Mint edition and download the latest ISO with your preferred desktop: Cinnamon, KDE, MATE or Xfce. For Cinnamon and MATE there are new ISOs labeled v2 with some important bug fixes.
I would like to suggest another solution that does not involve (re)formatting your hard-drive.
With a large and fast USB stick or an external hard-drive you may create a LiveUSB using a tool like the LinuxLive USB Creator (from Windows) or the MultiSystem software (the app or the a stand-alone Live distro burned on a DVD as a bootable OS).
You can use these tools to create a bootable Linux Mint with persistence, so you can use it without installing on your hard-drive because all the updates and files can be saved inside a file stored on your USB device (max. 4 GB can be used by default for the persistence file, but the Casper partition can be increased using GParted).
Then you may boot your Linux Mint edition of choice from your USB device with persistence enabled and see if it works with your Nvidia graphics and install another driver for your graphics card if needed.

r—e—a—n—i—m—a—t—i—o—n said:

So I tried the multisystem thing, USB pen drive, using latest 64bit cinnamon *v2.ISO and it seems to work. Selected the recommended Nvidia driver, and a wireless driver (had to use tethering via android to get the internets). So thats new! I don’t know why it works now. Thanks for the advice, in the past attempts I never saw the login screen! Though I can not adjust brightness (nothing happens, always full brightness), I’ll figure that out later. This is great progress :)

Again thanks for the responses!

I think i’ll go with the live USB stuff, done it before, even with other Distros. Then I’ll see what I’ll do from there. Yes i did notice a “*v2.iso” in them, so thats new. I’ll read the release note as well :) In the fast few months I did test latest Fedora (it worked for the most part, but some issues after update), Ubuntu (which i’m using), OpenSUSE (never got it to install), and Mint around the time it came out (No success -I did quite some digging, but I felt that it was way out of my level to find a solution). When I bought this laptop I thought yeah, some good hardware, more RAM, good processor, etc - boy I was wrong…

 will let you know what I do and if it works! thanks a bunch! :)

answering to the linuxmint message:

You are welcome! Please remember to read the release notes of each Linux Mint edition and download the latest ISO with your preferred desktop: Cinnamon, KDE, MATE or Xfce. For Cinnamon and MATE there are new ISOs labeled v2 with some important bug fixes.

I would like to suggest another solution that does not involve (re)formatting your hard-drive.

With a large and fast USB stick or an external hard-drive you may create a LiveUSB using a tool like the LinuxLive USB Creator (from Windows) or the MultiSystem software (the app or the a stand-alone Live distro burned on a DVD as a bootable OS).

You can use these tools to create a bootable Linux Mint with persistence, so you can use it without installing on your hard-drive because all the updates and files can be saved inside a file stored on your USB device (max. 4 GB can be used by default for the persistence file, but the Casper partition can be increased using GParted).

Then you may boot your Linux Mint edition of choice from your USB device with persistence enabled and see if it works with your Nvidia graphics and install another driver for your graphics card if needed.


5 notes

If you’re new to “Linux Sucks”, start with the 2014 video

The “Linux Sucks” videos have, combined, now been watched a total of over 1 Million times, so you may want to see all the videos on this topic:

Linux Sucks 2009

Linux Sucks 2010

Linux Sucks 2011

Linux Sucks 2012 / Doesn’t Suck 2012

Linux Sucks 2013 / Doesn’t Suck 2013

Linux Sucks 2014 (and with Spanish subtitles)

Download a bunch of slides recently uploaded by Bryan Lunduke on GitHub to find out why somebody thinks like that.

Do you agree that Linux Sucks?

(Source: lunduke.com)


14 notes

Download Linux Mint System Administrator's Practical Guide for Beginners

Preface
Chapter 1: Introduction to Linux Mint
  • Overview
  • A bit of history
  • Open source project
  • Contributing to the project
  • Why Linux Mint is different
  • Editions
  • Summary
  • References
Chapter 2: Installing Linux Mint
  • Creating a bootable Linux Mint USB flash drive
  • Time for action – downloading and burning the ISO image
  • Installing Linux Mint from a flash drive
  • Time for action – booting and installing Linux Mint
  • Booting Linux Mint
  • Time for action – booting Linux Mint for the first time
  • Summary
Chapter 3: Basic Shell
  • What’s a shell?
  • Where are you?
  • Time for action – learning pwd and cd commands
  • Running commands
  • Time for action – launching a program from the command line
  • Search commands
  • Time for action – using the which command
  • Listing, examining, and finding files
  • Time for action – using the ls, locate, find, and cat commands
  • Pipelines and redirection
  • Time for action – using pipelines and redirection by applying different commands
  • Setting environment variables
  • Time for action – setting the PATH environment variable
  • Displaying command history
  • Time for action – using the history command
  • Creating your first shell script
  • Time for action – creating and executing a shell script
  • How to get help
  • Time for action – using the man and the info commands
  • Summary
Chapter 4: Account Provisioning
  • Who am I?
  • Time for action – finding out the current user
  • Becoming the root user
  • Time for action – using the sudo command to become the root user
  • Changing password
  • Time for action – changing the password for a user
  • Adding a new user
  • Time for action – changing the password for a user
  • Adding a new group
  • Time for action – creating a new group called develop
  • Adding a user to a group
  • Time for action – adding the user luke to the develop group
  • Changing user privileges
  • Time for action – granting permissions to a user for monitoring system logs
  • Summary
Chapter 5: Installing, Removing, and Upgrading Software
  • Installing software
  • Time for action – installing AbiWord word processor
  • Removing software
  • Time for action – removing the AbiWord program
  • Upgrading software
  • Time for action – upgrading software through the Update Manager tool
  • Summary
Chapter 6: Configuring hardware
  • Detecting hardware
  • Time for action – how to display the device information
  • Configuring your monitor
  • Time for action – changing the screen resolution
  • Configuring a keyboard
  • Time for action – adding a new layout
  • Configuring your mouse
  • Time for action – changing mouse orientation
  • Configuring sound
  • Time for action – how to enable window and button sound
  • Installing additional drivers
  • Summary
Chapter 7: Networking
  • Configuring a wired network
  • Time for action – configuring your connection
  • Configuring the wireless network
  • Time for action – how to connect your computer to a wireless network
  • Accessing a Windows-shared folder
  • Time for action – how to access a specific shared folder
  • Connecting to servers
  • Time for action – connecting to an FTP server
  • Summary
Chapter 8: Storage and Backup
  • Filesystem types
  • Disk quotas
  • Time for action – assigning disk quota to a specific user
  • Disk usage analysis
  • Time for action – examining disk usage
  • Creating backups
  • Time for action – making a backup of a specific folder
  • Restoring backups
  • Time for action – restoring a backup folder
  • Summary
Chapter 9: Security
  • Running an SSH server
  • Time for action – installing and configuring an SSH server
  • Installing an anti-virus software
  • Time for action – installing Clam-AV anti-virus
  • Configuring a firewall
  • Time for action – how to configure a simple firewall
  • Using a security module for the kernel
  • Time for action – installing AppArmor
  • Managing your password safely
  • Time for action – installing and using KeePass
  • Building a security checklist
  • Summary
Chapter 10: Monitoring Your System
  • Processes and services
  • Starting and stopping services
  • Time for action – stopping and starting an SSH daemon
  • Activating services
  • Time for action – activating Samba
  • Listing the running processes
  • Time for action – list the processes running on our machine
  • Displaying CPU, memory, and network usage
  • Time for action – Displaying resources information in real time
  • Summary
Chapter 11: Troubleshooting
  • Hardware
  • Time for action – checking memory, CPU, USB, and PCI devices
  • Checking log files
  • Time for action – listing the last five lines of the syslog file
  • Kernel
  • Time for action – using lsmod, modprobe, and dmesg commands
  • Networking
  • Time for action – checking who is listening on what port
  • Processes and filesystems
  • Time for action – finding a specific process
  • Summary

7 notes