#Linux Mint #LinuxMint #LMDE #Linux #Debian #Ubuntu #Xfce #MATE desktop #KDE #Cinnamon desktop 

r—e—a—n—i—m—a—t—i—o—n said:

So I tried the multisystem thing, USB pen drive, using latest 64bit cinnamon *v2.ISO and it seems to work. Selected the recommended Nvidia driver, and a wireless driver (had to use tethering via android to get the internets). So thats new! I don’t know why it works now. Thanks for the advice, in the past attempts I never saw the login screen! Though I can not adjust brightness (nothing happens, always full brightness), I’ll figure that out later. This is great progress :)


Again thanks for the responses!
I think i’ll go with the live USB stuff, done it before, even with other Distros. Then I’ll see what I’ll do from there. Yes i did notice a “*v2.iso” in them, so thats new. I’ll read the release note as well :) In the fast few months I did test latest Fedora (it worked for the most part, but some issues after update), Ubuntu (which i’m using), OpenSUSE (never got it to install), and Mint around the time it came out (No success -I did quite some digging, but I felt that it was way out of my level to find a solution). When I bought this laptop I thought yeah, some good hardware, more RAM, good processor, etc - boy I was wrong…
 will let you know what I do and if it works! thanks a bunch! :)


answering to the linuxmint message:

You are welcome! Please remember to read the release notes of each Linux Mint edition and download the latest ISO with your preferred desktop: Cinnamon, KDE, MATE or Xfce. For Cinnamon and MATE there are new ISOs labeled v2 with some important bug fixes.
I would like to suggest another solution that does not involve (re)formatting your hard-drive.
With a large and fast USB stick or an external hard-drive you may create a LiveUSB using a tool like the LinuxLive USB Creator (from Windows) or the MultiSystem software (the app or the a stand-alone Live distro burned on a DVD as a bootable OS).
You can use these tools to create a bootable Linux Mint with persistence, so you can use it without installing on your hard-drive because all the updates and files can be saved inside a file stored on your USB device (max. 4 GB can be used by default for the persistence file, but the Casper partition can be increased using GParted).
Then you may boot your Linux Mint edition of choice from your USB device with persistence enabled and see if it works with your Nvidia graphics and install another driver for your graphics card if needed.

r—e—a—n—i—m—a—t—i—o—n said:

So I tried the multisystem thing, USB pen drive, using latest 64bit cinnamon *v2.ISO and it seems to work. Selected the recommended Nvidia driver, and a wireless driver (had to use tethering via android to get the internets). So thats new! I don’t know why it works now. Thanks for the advice, in the past attempts I never saw the login screen! Though I can not adjust brightness (nothing happens, always full brightness), I’ll figure that out later. This is great progress :)

Again thanks for the responses!

I think i’ll go with the live USB stuff, done it before, even with other Distros. Then I’ll see what I’ll do from there. Yes i did notice a “*v2.iso” in them, so thats new. I’ll read the release note as well :) In the fast few months I did test latest Fedora (it worked for the most part, but some issues after update), Ubuntu (which i’m using), OpenSUSE (never got it to install), and Mint around the time it came out (No success -I did quite some digging, but I felt that it was way out of my level to find a solution). When I bought this laptop I thought yeah, some good hardware, more RAM, good processor, etc - boy I was wrong…

 will let you know what I do and if it works! thanks a bunch! :)

answering to the linuxmint message:

You are welcome! Please remember to read the release notes of each Linux Mint edition and download the latest ISO with your preferred desktop: Cinnamon, KDE, MATE or Xfce. For Cinnamon and MATE there are new ISOs labeled v2 with some important bug fixes.

I would like to suggest another solution that does not involve (re)formatting your hard-drive.

With a large and fast USB stick or an external hard-drive you may create a LiveUSB using a tool like the LinuxLive USB Creator (from Windows) or the MultiSystem software (the app or the a stand-alone Live distro burned on a DVD as a bootable OS).

You can use these tools to create a bootable Linux Mint with persistence, so you can use it without installing on your hard-drive because all the updates and files can be saved inside a file stored on your USB device (max. 4 GB can be used by default for the persistence file, but the Casper partition can be increased using GParted).

Then you may boot your Linux Mint edition of choice from your USB device with persistence enabled and see if it works with your Nvidia graphics and install another driver for your graphics card if needed.


4 notes

If you’re new to “Linux Sucks”, start with the 2014 video

The “Linux Sucks” videos have, combined, now been watched a total of over 1 Million times, so you may want to see all the videos on this topic:

Linux Sucks 2009

Linux Sucks 2010

Linux Sucks 2011

Linux Sucks 2012 / Doesn’t Suck 2012

Linux Sucks 2013 / Doesn’t Suck 2013

Linux Sucks 2014 (and with Spanish subtitles)

Download a bunch of slides recently uploaded by Bryan Lunduke on GitHub to find out why somebody thinks like that.

Do you agree that Linux Sucks?

(Source: lunduke.com)


14 notes

Download Linux Mint System Administrator's Practical Guide for Beginners

Preface
Chapter 1: Introduction to Linux Mint
  • Overview
  • A bit of history
  • Open source project
  • Contributing to the project
  • Why Linux Mint is different
  • Editions
  • Summary
  • References
Chapter 2: Installing Linux Mint
  • Creating a bootable Linux Mint USB flash drive
  • Time for action – downloading and burning the ISO image
  • Installing Linux Mint from a flash drive
  • Time for action – booting and installing Linux Mint
  • Booting Linux Mint
  • Time for action – booting Linux Mint for the first time
  • Summary
Chapter 3: Basic Shell
  • What’s a shell?
  • Where are you?
  • Time for action – learning pwd and cd commands
  • Running commands
  • Time for action – launching a program from the command line
  • Search commands
  • Time for action – using the which command
  • Listing, examining, and finding files
  • Time for action – using the ls, locate, find, and cat commands
  • Pipelines and redirection
  • Time for action – using pipelines and redirection by applying different commands
  • Setting environment variables
  • Time for action – setting the PATH environment variable
  • Displaying command history
  • Time for action – using the history command
  • Creating your first shell script
  • Time for action – creating and executing a shell script
  • How to get help
  • Time for action – using the man and the info commands
  • Summary
Chapter 4: Account Provisioning
  • Who am I?
  • Time for action – finding out the current user
  • Becoming the root user
  • Time for action – using the sudo command to become the root user
  • Changing password
  • Time for action – changing the password for a user
  • Adding a new user
  • Time for action – changing the password for a user
  • Adding a new group
  • Time for action – creating a new group called develop
  • Adding a user to a group
  • Time for action – adding the user luke to the develop group
  • Changing user privileges
  • Time for action – granting permissions to a user for monitoring system logs
  • Summary
Chapter 5: Installing, Removing, and Upgrading Software
  • Installing software
  • Time for action – installing AbiWord word processor
  • Removing software
  • Time for action – removing the AbiWord program
  • Upgrading software
  • Time for action – upgrading software through the Update Manager tool
  • Summary
Chapter 6: Configuring hardware
  • Detecting hardware
  • Time for action – how to display the device information
  • Configuring your monitor
  • Time for action – changing the screen resolution
  • Configuring a keyboard
  • Time for action – adding a new layout
  • Configuring your mouse
  • Time for action – changing mouse orientation
  • Configuring sound
  • Time for action – how to enable window and button sound
  • Installing additional drivers
  • Summary
Chapter 7: Networking
  • Configuring a wired network
  • Time for action – configuring your connection
  • Configuring the wireless network
  • Time for action – how to connect your computer to a wireless network
  • Accessing a Windows-shared folder
  • Time for action – how to access a specific shared folder
  • Connecting to servers
  • Time for action – connecting to an FTP server
  • Summary
Chapter 8: Storage and Backup
  • Filesystem types
  • Disk quotas
  • Time for action – assigning disk quota to a specific user
  • Disk usage analysis
  • Time for action – examining disk usage
  • Creating backups
  • Time for action – making a backup of a specific folder
  • Restoring backups
  • Time for action – restoring a backup folder
  • Summary
Chapter 9: Security
  • Running an SSH server
  • Time for action – installing and configuring an SSH server
  • Installing an anti-virus software
  • Time for action – installing Clam-AV anti-virus
  • Configuring a firewall
  • Time for action – how to configure a simple firewall
  • Using a security module for the kernel
  • Time for action – installing AppArmor
  • Managing your password safely
  • Time for action – installing and using KeePass
  • Building a security checklist
  • Summary
Chapter 10: Monitoring Your System
  • Processes and services
  • Starting and stopping services
  • Time for action – stopping and starting an SSH daemon
  • Activating services
  • Time for action – activating Samba
  • Listing the running processes
  • Time for action – list the processes running on our machine
  • Displaying CPU, memory, and network usage
  • Time for action – Displaying resources information in real time
  • Summary
Chapter 11: Troubleshooting
  • Hardware
  • Time for action – checking memory, CPU, USB, and PCI devices
  • Checking log files
  • Time for action – listing the last five lines of the syslog file
  • Kernel
  • Time for action – using lsmod, modprobe, and dmesg commands
  • Networking
  • Time for action – checking who is listening on what port
  • Processes and filesystems
  • Time for action – finding a specific process
  • Summary

6 notes

GOG.com Now Supports Linux!


10 notes

Upgrade to the latest Linux Mint Cinnamon desktop

tatrtotz:

I just upgraded to Linux Mint 17 the other day and holy shit Cinnamon works so much better, and it looks so much nicer.


3 notes

Steam games available for Linux Mint

cognitive-dissident:

My desktop pc took a shit on me and I’ve been trying to fix it all week.  Sadly, this is starting to look like the kind of problem that will require money.

So in the meantime I’ve plugged in a Linux live OS.  It’s not like I don’t have a phone and like three laptops so I think I’ll live.

I really want my games folder back; but the majority of what I use the desktop for anymore is just photo editing and storage.  If the steam catalog available to Linux is good enough I might just stick with Linux Mint for a while

(via cognitive-dissident-deactivated)


2 notes

Download Linux Mint Essentials May 2014

  • Preface
  • Chapter 1: Meet Linux Mint
    • Why choose Linux?
    • What is a distribution?
    • Is Linux hard to learn?
    • What Mint does differently
    • Releases and support
    • Mint-specific tools
    • Interacting with the Linux Mint community
    • Creating community and forum accounts
    • Meet the community
    • Summary
  • Chapter 2: Creating Boot Media and Installing Linux Mint
    • Which version to download?
      • The Linux Mint KDE edition
      • The Linux Mint Xfce edition
      • The Linux Mint MATE edition
      • The Linux Mint Cinnamon edition
    • The different methods of installing Linux Mint
    • Creating a bootable DVD
    • Creating a bootable USB flash drive
    • Testing your live media
    • Planning your partitioning scheme
    • The installation process
    • To encrypt or not to encrypt
    • Summary
  • Chapter 3: Getting Acquainted with Cinnamon
    • Getting familiar with Cinnamon
    • Logging in to Cinnamon
    • Launching programs
    • Monitoring tasks
    • Utilizing workspaces
    • Notifications
    • Creating launchers
    • Bundled applications
    • File management with Nemo
    • Configuring the settings of Cinnamon
    • Changing the default search engine in Firefox
    • Changing themes
    • Summary
  • Chapter 4: An Introduction to the Terminal
    • Why should we use the terminal?
    • Accessing the shell
    • Executing commands
    • Navigating the filesystem
    • Managing files
    • The nano text editor
    • Reading manual pages with the man command
    • Searching for files
    • Using the watch command
    • Introduction to scripting
    • Summary
  • Chapter 5: Utilizing Storage and Media
    • Accessing removable media
    • Formatting flash drives
    • Mounting and unmounting volumes
    • Automatically mounting volumes at boot time
    • Analyzing disk usage
    • Understanding gibibytes versus gigabytes and mebibytes versus megabytes
    • Burning CDs and DVDs
    • Using the USB Image Writer
    • Understanding how Universally Unique Identifiers work
    • Summary
  • Chapter 6: Installing and Removing Software
    • Managing packages in Linux Mint
    • Using the Mint Software Manager
    • Installing new applications
      • Frozen Bubble
      • FileZilla
      • Minitube
      • Steam
    • Removing applications
    • Using the Synaptic Package Manager
    • Configuring software sources
    • Advanced package management
    • Keeping your system up to date
    • Summary
  • Chapter 7: Enjoying Multimedia on Mint
    • Understanding issues concerning codecs
    • Playing music files
    • Ripping an audio CD
    • Editing MP3 tags
    • Playing video files
    • Playing a DVD
    • Viewing photos
    • Editing photos with GIMP
    • Accessing your webcam
    • Recording your desktop
    • Summary
  • Chapter 8: Managing Users and Permissions
    • Creating new users
    • Changing passwords
    • Revoking access temporarily
    • Removing user accounts
    • Running commands or programs as other users
    • Administrative access via sudo and visudo
    • Understanding file and directory permissions
    • Modifying file and directory permissions
    • Summary
  • Chapter 9: Connecting to Networks
    • Connecting to a wired network
    • Setting up a static IP
    • Connecting to a wireless network
    • An introduction to SSH
    • Accessing your system via SSH
    • Accessing FTP servers
    • Sharing files with Samba
    • Sharing files with NFS
    • Summary
  • Chapter 10: Securing Linux Mint
    • Choosing secure passwords
    • Encrypting your home folder
    • Configuring and testing the iptables firewall
    • Installing and configuring ClamAV
    • Blocking access to specific websites
    • Backing up and restoring important data
    • Creating and restoring snapshots
    • Hardening your system
    • Summary
  • Chapter 11: Advanced Administration Techniques
    • Creating command aliases
    • Making aliases persistent
    • Killing processes
    • Setting up cron jobs
    • Preparing to move to a new release
    • Exporting and importing package lists
    • Using variables and conditional statements in Bash
    • Monitoring resource usage
    • Monitoring CPU temperatures
    • Sending system reports via e-mail
    • Summary
  • Chapter 12: Troubleshooting Linux Mint
    • Performing the initial triage
    • Troubleshooting in Software Rendering Mode
    • Diagnosing boot issues
    • Recovering data
    • Perusing system logs
    • Reinstalling GRUB
    • Testing the RAM
    • Pinpointing audio issues
    • Solving problems with networking
    • Solving slow frame rates in games
    • Getting help from the community
    • Summary
  • Appendix A: Reinstalling Mint while Retaining Data
    • Considering LTS releases
    • Why an upgrade utility isn’t included
    • Preparing for the migration
    • Installing Linux Mint while retaining /home
    • Importing a list of packages for reinstallation
    • Summary
  • Appendix B: Using the MATE Edition of Linux Mint
    • Introducing MATE
    • Understanding the differences between MATE and Cinnamon
    • Launching applications
    • Customizing MATE
      • Desktop background
      • Screensaver
      • Panel applets
      • Desktop themes
    • Summary
  • Appendix C: Using the KDE Edition of Linux Mint
    • Understanding the KDE desktop
    • Using Dolphin – KDE’s file manager
    • Adding Plasmoids to the desktop
    • Discovering Mint KDE’s default applications
    • Utilizing Activities and Virtual Desktops
    • Configuring network connections
    • Summary
  • Index

15 notes

Interview with Clem, the leader of Linux Mint - LME Linux

Clement Lefebvre (clem) is the founder of Linux Mint. I caught him on IRC and asked a couple of quick questions.

Do you think LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition) could be the main Mint edition anytime soon?

No.

Now that you have an LTS base for future releases do you feel it makes things easier for you? Can we expect Mint apps to be improved / developed much faster?

Yes, definitely but not only..
It also allows us to fix more things on the base itself. On a 6 months base, if say something was deviating too much from Ubuntu, required too much work, or was planned to be fixed upstream, we didn’t fix it, it wasn’t worth the effort. On a 2+ years base, it’s a different story, we’re much more demanding. It’s not only something we’ll use for much more time, it’s our ONLY base during that time.

Some users are worried that they’ll get older packages because of the decision to move to an LTS base. What would you say to them?

They’re right, they’ll get older packages than in Arch, Fedora, Ubuntu, but they’ll catch up every 2 years. Also, on things people care about (Firefox, common apps, DEs) we can backport easily. What’s static is what people don’t really care about like libs, stacks. Last but not least, 3rd party devs can target a 2 year base much better than an unstable, constantly moving 6 month cycle. Valve say can support Mint much better if it’s stable and changes base every 2 years.

What do you think about elementary OS?

Nothing much. They’re experimenting with UI trends that differ from ours so it’s interesting now and then to check them out to see what they’re doing. Similar to Mint, GNOME, Ubuntu and Pinyin they’re also a “product” project so they’re innovating and they’re interested in proper integration, so just as for the other projects, it’s interesting for us to learn from them whenever we can. We had a few contacts with them, talked design on a few occasions (LSB, filebrowser actions) and it’s gone well so far.


2 notes

LME Linux - News, interviews, tutorials and information about Linux Mint, elementary OS and Linux in general.

LME Linux is a blog about Linux operating systems, mainly about elementary OS and Linux Mint. That’s why the name is LME (Linux Mint / Elementary OS).

I’m a Linux enthusiast who’s reading news about Linux every day. My favourite blogs are OMG! Ubuntu! and Webupd8 which are both more about Ubuntu but sometimes they also cover news about Mint and elementary.

I couldn’t really find an up to date blog about my favourite systems so I thought I’ll create one. That’s why this blog was born.

I’m Hungarian so I don’t speak English native, I might have some grammar or spelling issues, please feel free to correct me.

I plan to update this blog regularly with new content and I also want to make interviews and occasionaly cover other distros (like Arch, which is also one of my favourites), post tutorials, etc.

If you like elementary OS or Linux Mint or just Linux in general then this is a place for you!


3 notes

r--e--a--n--i--m--a--t--i--o--n said: Hey, I've been using Linux for a while, and years back I switched to Linux Mint (from Ubuntu). Recently I attempted to install the latest Linux Mint, in this *new* laptop, and it failed. I have Linux Mint working on an older laptop perfectly, but this newer laptop was impossible so I went to the latest Ubuntu. Only Cuz I absolutely HATE Win 8. Any advice? hints? tips? Its a Lenovo Y510p 15,6" Full HD/Core i7-4700MQ/16 GB/GT 755M 2 GB SLI/256 GB SSD/Windows 8 laptop. It has EFI, Nvidia graphics.

r—e—a—n—i—m—a—t—i—o—n:

linuxmint:

According to the Linux Mint Community Hardware Database, your laptop should work perfectly with Linux Mint 17 Qiana LTS.

You can find advice and hints reading some Linux Mint Community Tutorials, like the folowing ones:

How to install Linux on UEFI systems where GRUB fail to install?

UEFI Install dual-boot

From the experience of a Lenovo ThinkCentre Edge72 user:

  1. Run Mint live CD, use GPARTED to create new partition table —> “MS DOS” (this means you should set some free unallocated disk space from your windows machine)
  2. Make following changes in BIOS: startup - boot mode —> legacy only (I think legacy means not EFI); startup - boot priority —> legacy first; security - secure boot —> disabled. Save the BIOS and restart the machine.
  3. Install Win7 from the DVD (which did not convert the partition table) at the start of the disc, created a data partition leaving a space for Mint 13 Maya at the end.
  4. Install Linux Mint.
  5. The first start of Windows 7 gave an error but it clicked past and started.
  6. Now it works fine with selection of the operating systems in Grub.

Please note that you may replace the steps 3 and 4 with:

Press “Esc button” during restart to select a bootable Linux Mint USB. Now you can follows the normal installation procedure as in below tutorial:

http://www.avoiderrors.net/dual-boot-linux-mint-14-nadia-with-windows-7/

Once after the Linux Mint installation is finished, follow the below tutorial to fix/create boot menu for OS selection (Win 7 or Linux Mint):

http://linuxpoison.blogspot.de/2012/02/tool-to-repair-frequent-boot-problems.html

Let us know if it works for you! Is this advice what you need?

Thank you so much for the response linuxmint, I will let you know how it goes once I try it, I have to do some cleaning up before I can attempt that procedure. But I shall do that soon as I’m able to. I did at least remember I had to disable something in bios, legacy mode something, but in the end I got blank screens upon installation attempts. I have a feeling that this UEFI and NVIDIA graphics stuff is the real challenge. Its the only difference I can think of, that my old laptop and my new one has. I don’t wanna get in too technical with this, cuz I’m not too nerdy, just a regular user who knows some few tricks. I imagine for a regular user/ new timer, this could be a migraine. I never had a problem with dual boot, or even quad boot couple years back. I guess I’m a few steps behind with this new *stuff*…

You are welcome! Please remember to read the release notes of each Linux Mint edition and download the latest ISO with your preferred desktop: Cinnamon, KDE, MATE or Xfce. For Cinnamon and MATE there are new ISOs labeled v2 with some important bug fixes.

I would like to suggest another solution that does not involve (re)formatting your hard-drive.

With a large and fast USB stick or an external hard-drive you may create a LiveUSB using a tool like the LinuxLive USB Creator (from Windows) or the MultiSystem software (the app or the a stand-alone Live distro burned on a DVD as a bootable OS).

You can use these tools to create a bootable Linux Mint with persistence, so you can use it without installing on your hard-drive because all the updates and files can be saved inside a file stored on your USB device (max. 4 GB can be used by default for the persistence file, but the Casper partition can be increased using GParted).

Then you may boot your Linux Mint edition of choice from your USB device with persistence enabled and see if it works with your Nvidia graphics and install another driver for your graphics card if needed.


8 notes

Boot-Repair is a simple tool to recover access to your Operating Systems:

  • Easy-to-use (repair in 1 click ! )
  • Free (GPL open-source license)
  • Helpful (Boot-Info summary to get help by email or on your favorite forum)
  • Safe (automatic backups)
  • Popular (300.000 users per year)
  • Can recover access to Windows (XP, Vista, Windows7, Windows8).
  • Can recover access to Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, OpenSuse, ArchLinux…
  • Can recover access to any OS (Windows, MacOS, Linux…) if your PC contains Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, OpenSuse, ArchLinux, or derivative.
  • Can repair MBR-locked OEM computer boot if the original bootsector has been saved by Clean-Ubiquity
  • Can repair the boot when you have the “GRUB Recovery” error message
  • Options to reinstall GRUB2/GRUB1 bootloader easily (OS by default, purge, unhide, kernel options..)
  • and much more ! (UEFI, SecureBoot, RAID, LVM, Wubi, filesystem repair…)

GET BOOT-REPAIR: whatever the systems installed on your disk, choose one of the 3 methods below:

  • RECOMMENDED: boot on a Boot-Repair-Disk. Boot-Repair will be launched automatically.
  • OR boot on a Linux-Secure disk, choose “Try Ubuntu”, and run Boot-Repair via the shortcut at the left of the desktop.
  • OR boot on a Debian (or derivatives: Ubuntu, Linux Mint…) disk, either normal session, or live-CD, or live-USB. Then install Boot-Repair in it, either via PPA for Ubuntu/Mint, or DEBs for Debian.

USE BOOT-REPAIR:
Launch Boot-Repair, then click the “Recommended repair” button. When repair is finished, note the URL (paste.ubuntu.com/XXXXX) that appears on a paper, then reboot and check if you recovered access to your OSs. If the repair did not succeed, indicate the URL to boot.repair@gmail.com in order to get help.
Warning: the default settings of the Advanced Options are the ones used by the “Recommended Repair”. Changing them may worsen your problem. Don’t modify them before asking advice.

GET HELP: by Email (boot.repair ATT gmail DOT com)

HELP THE PROJECT: Translate, Propose patches, or Donate (Paypal account:boot.repair@gmail.com)

DISCLAIMER: Boot-Repair is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but without any warranty. Please be aware that Boot-Repair writes logs&backups on disks, collects anonymous statistics about its use, and creates Pastebin containing basic system data such as partition labels, UUIDs and mount points (just disconnect internet if you want these data remain local).


21 notes

r--e--a--n--i--m--a--t--i--o--n said: Hey, I've been using Linux for a while, and years back I switched to Linux Mint (from Ubuntu). Recently I attempted to install the latest Linux Mint, in this *new* laptop, and it failed. I have Linux Mint working on an older laptop perfectly, but this newer laptop was impossible so I went to the latest Ubuntu. Only Cuz I absolutely HATE Win 8. Any advice? hints? tips? Its a Lenovo Y510p 15,6" Full HD/Core i7-4700MQ/16 GB/GT 755M 2 GB SLI/256 GB SSD/Windows 8 laptop. It has EFI, Nvidia graphics.

According to the Linux Mint Community Hardware Database, your laptop should work perfectly with Linux Mint 17 Qiana LTS.

You can find advice and hints reading some Linux Mint Community Tutorials, like the folowing ones:

How to install Linux on UEFI systems where GRUB fail to install?

UEFI Install dual-boot

From the experience of a Lenovo ThinkCentre Edge72 user:

  1. Run Mint live CD, use GPARTED to create new partition table —> “MS DOS” (this means you should set some free unallocated disk space from your windows machine)
  2. Make following changes in BIOS: startup - boot mode —> legacy only (I think legacy means not EFI); startup - boot priority —> legacy first; security - secure boot —> disabled. Save the BIOS and restart the machine.
  3. Install Win7 from the DVD (which did not convert the partition table) at the start of the disc, created a data partition leaving a space for Mint 13 Maya at the end.
  4. Install Linux Mint.
  5. The first start of Windows 7 gave an error but it clicked past and started.
  6. Now it works fine with selection of the operating systems in Grub.

Please note that you may replace the steps 3 and 4 with:

Press “Esc button” during restart to select a bootable Linux Mint USB. Now you can follows the normal installation procedure as in below tutorial:

http://www.avoiderrors.net/dual-boot-linux-mint-14-nadia-with-windows-7/

Once after the Linux Mint installation is finished, follow the below tutorial to fix/create boot menu for OS selection (Win 7 or Linux Mint):

http://linuxpoison.blogspot.de/2012/02/tool-to-repair-frequent-boot-problems.html

Let us know if it works for you! Is this advice what you need?


8 notes

Systemback is a simple system backup and restore application with extra features:

Systemback makes it easy to create backups of system and users configuration files. In case of problems you can easily restore the previous state of the system. There are extra features like system copying, system installation and Live system creation.

Available for Linux Mint 17 LTS & 13 LTS and for Ubuntu 14.04/14.10/12.04. To install and run the SystemBack application in Linux Mint / Ubuntu open Terminal (Press Ctrl+Alt+T) and copy the following commands in the Terminal:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nemh/systemback

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install systemback

sudo systemback

Please note that using System Restore will not restore documents, music, emails, or personal files of any kind.


4 notes

blackwolfoftexas:

Linux Mint is now mine.


2 notes
nant:

Speedy Mint. #linux #mint

nant:

Speedy Mint. #linux #mint


4 notes